Bowler looks ahead to next season following conference title

Competing in gymnastics and softball, Delaney Insinga uses her skills with hope of another title next year for bowling.

Delaney Insinga, center-left, thrives on the experience she had during the winter sports season for Seneca High School’s bowling team individually and with her teammates Aubrey Packard, Megan Gallagher, Brenna Derby, Ann Marie Zack and Riley Packard (Alison Insinga/Special to The Sun).

Editor’s note: The interview was conducted prior to the novel coronavirus pandemic that forced closure of Seneca High School until April 20.

Two years was all it took for bowler Delaney Insinga to join a sport and become a conference champion — a feat she hopes to carry into next season.

Insinga has only recently mastered the sport, but in February, the sophomore bowled her way to becoming the 2019-2020 Olympic Conference Champion with the rest of her Seneca High School team.

“It was a good environment that day because we were happy and excited and we knew what we had to do, and we tried our best,” Insinga said.

Insinga’s aspirations for the state championship were cut short by the coronavirus pandemic,  but she still sees the season as a lesson.

“It feels really good considering when I first started on how to bowl, my coach really helped me become a better bowler,” she shared.

Insinga is also Seneca’s first girl to advance to the states. Her team had an overall record of 14-2 in the regular season. Individually, Insinga bowled a 500-series, placing 15th during the qualifiers to make it to state.

Other than her family, the 15-year-old said she received a wealth of support from her coaches and teammates during the season to get through the highs and lows of the sport. Insinga got pointers, including how to turn her wrists in a certain direction, pull elbows in and direct her feet a certain way. Her experience in gymnastics and softball were a help in bowling

“Softball helps with me bowling and gymnastics helps with my stance or my arms,” explained Insinga, who bowls with a 13-pound ball.  “When my coach says to point my elbow inwards, I know how to do that. Even in something as small as ‘you’re turning your wrist’ I know what that means.”

Insinga plays second base and outfield in softball and participates in the all-around events in gymnastics, all for Seneca. The Olympic Conference Championship inspired her to take a   leadership role with younger bowlers.

“If anyone’s down, I give them pointers, or if someone’s struggling, I just try to help them in the best of my abilities,” she noted.