Burlington County nonprofit is seeking local volunteers

Mall of Hope, Inc., is determined to find new ways to engage outreach in local communities

A Burlington County nonprofit is determined to find new ways to engage outreach in local communities.

Mall of Hope, Inc., a startup 501c3 organization in Burlington County, recently released a statement that it is in search of new ways to assist various groups.

Officials from the organization said they felt a “problem” with various nonprofit startups is associated administrative costs.

“[The costs] are often crippling, leaving the nonprofit with barely any left to provide,” officials said in a statement. “Mall of Hope, Inc. wants to make a fundamental change.”

Intent on making that change, officials from the startup organization said they intend to help solve problems and provide services to those who need them the most. According to the nonprofit’s website, its goal is “to keep administrative costs within a 10 percent budget while 90 percent of donations will be distributed to the worthwhile causes that will help others.”

“Most nonprofits run almost exclusively on donations made throughout the year,” Mall of Hope Director Christopher Jones, said in a statement. “My goal with Mall of Hope is to create ways where nonprofits can be sustainable throughout the year without depending so heavily on donations. Donations will continue to be a necessary part, but the importance will be diminished.”

Jones said he is working to help get his startup running, but admits the organization is still in need of volunteer assistance.

“I am actively looking for volunteers to come and help,” he said. “We do need donations for certain, but it is the goal of Mall of Hope to (be) more self-sustaining with the work of the volunteers to keep donations at a bare minimum. This is a lofty goal for sure, but it is one I believe we can accomplish with the right people.”

The director also explained that he is involved in various projects ranging from land and environmental initiatives to helping with the expenses of college tuition. He said his goal is to have approximately 20 or so volunteers who can help any way to the best of their abilities.

According to the group’s website, some of its other outreach efforts include a land initiative for modified graveyards and solar farms; a new employment initiative for a modified restaurant for hearing impaired and disabled people; an animals initiative for a veterinary clinic assistance platform; and a restoration initiative to restore lives, jobs and companies worldwide.

“Any help is appreciated,” Jones said. “Time is precious, but there is a chance to leave behind a legacy of good works.”

To learn more about the Burlington County nonprofit group and its programs, visit its website at www.mallofhope.com.