Voorhees resident named award winner as small businessperson

Having started her own business from home over a decade ago, Emily Morgan hopes to expose local students to entrepreneurship in the future

Emily Morgan, a Voorhees Township resident, has been recognized as The Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia Small Business Person of the Year.

In an ever-evolving world and workforce, jobs and careers are often changing. With that comes changes to the way jobs can be done and performed, leading to out of the box thinking, something potentially nontraditional and unexpected from what those that do those jobs may have conceptualized after leaving high school or college.

For Voorhees resident Emily Morgan, her career after college has been just that – unexpected from what she may have dreamed of early on in life.

Raised by teachers throughout her family, Morgan went on to graduate from the University of Pennsylvania with a degree in English. However, she has since focused on entrepreneurship and went on to become founder and CEO of her company, Delegate Solutions, a home-based organization that operates completely remotely to work with businesses to provide consultative executive support.

When starting her company 12 years ago, Morgan was pregnant with her son Nathan while she sought a job outside the traditional nine-to-five that would provide her with the ability to work from home.

Now, Morgan has been recognized as The Chamber of Commerce for Greater Philadelphia Small Business Person of the Year, despite not having a background in business before founding her company.

“I never really had an interest in entrepreneurship growing up, I wasn’t really exposed to it and I never thought of it as a career path,” Morgan said. “But I feel like rather I sort of fell into it.”

Having received this recognition, Morgan hopes to be able to spread awareness and resources to all students about the potential of entrepreneurship. Being an English major throughout school, Morgan didn’t think to seek out business-specific classes and wasn’t made aware of the potential of entrepreneurship, something she hopes to change.

“It’s something that’s breaking the boundaries of traditional workforce,” Morgan said.

Morgan also serves with the Voorhees Business Development Committee, focusing most of her time over the past four years to host small business events and expos that help connect local businesses.

In her effort to help students better understand the potential of entrepreneurship, she is currently searching for ways to present such information in a meaningful way to students.

“My experience is that I feel like I was never presented with entrepreneurship in any way that was impactful, maybe I just wasn’t aware of it at the time,” Morgan said. “But I wound up thinking I was on one life path, but I could have been exposed to all of this so much earlier. So even just creating an exposure program for local students that can show students that they can consider that as a career path.”

In doing so, Morgan hopes she would be able to interest students like herself, over a decade ago, that never had such an opportunity or simply didn’t recognize it at the time.

“I would hope I can help create something that solves the problem I had as a student where I wasn’t going to take entrepreneurship classes because I didn’t think of myself in a business-sense,” said Morgan. “But if there’s an exposure program that exposes students of all types to experience it in a unique way, that’s what I would want to do.”