Burlington County Division of Mosquito Control asks residents to continue preventive measures against mosquitoes

During the rainy season, the Burlington County Division of Mosquito Control have asked residents to take part in the preventive efforts in keeping the mosquito population controlled. Due to the increase in average rainfall this year, Mosquitos have been a point of discussion throughout the summer.

During the rainy season, the Burlington County Division of Mosquito Control has asked residents to take part in preventive efforts to keep the mosquito population controlled. Due to the increase in average rainfall this year, mosquitoes have been a point of discussion throughout the summer. 

According to Tom Verna, an entomologist for the Burlington County Division of Mosquito Control, mosquitoes require water to breed. Often, summer storms knock down branches and clog drains, which creates stagnant water. The sitting water is perfect for mosquito breeding. 

Therefore, the county suggests residents should take part in the Four D’s technique; Drain standing water routinely, use insect repellent with DEET, be especially careful around dusk and dawn, and lastly, dress in long sleeves and pants where mosquitoes are active.  

“A mMosquito can complete its lifecycle in as little as five to seven days, so it is critical to clear all standing water off your property,” said Verna. “Mosquitoes generally live their entire lives within 100 yards of the stagnant water they were born in. To eliminate mosquitoes, try and eliminate stagnant water on your property, discuss efforts with neighbors, and look online at the county website for more information on what you can do to combat pests in your yard.

“Mosquitoes are more active during dusk and dawn,” Verna continued. “Residents should wear long sleeves or sit near fans to keep mosquitos away, and use DEET, which is a very reliable repellent method. Studies show that it works the best out of what we have available and it has been used more than any other repellent on the market.”

One of the main reasons controlling the mosquito populations is necessary is because mosquitoes are carriers of diseases. These diseases include Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus, West Nile Virus and Jamestown Canyon Virus, which can infect humans and can become very dangerous. 

“The reservoir for these viruses are typically birds,” said Verna. “At this time, there are no known cases of mosquito-borne illnesses in Burlington County residents, but they are of particular concern for the young, elderly and pregnant women. The age groups named can be particularly susceptible to any disease, including those spread by mosquitoes.”

In response to the rainy season and mosquito control, the county has undertaken a variety of mosquito control methods. The county uses integrated pest management techniques. A fact sheet about what the Burlington County Division of Mosquito Control has done can be found on its website at www.co.burlington.nj.us under document center.