Sun Editorial: New Jersey №1 when it comes to people moving away

United Van Lines’ 42nd Annual National Movers Study tracked the company’s customers’ state-to-state migration patterns in 2018.

By Alan Bauer
The Sun

The grass is, apparently, greener in places other than New Jersey. Once again, the state is a leader when it comes to residents finding other states to live in.

United Van Lines’ 42nd Annual National Movers Study tracked the company’s customers’ state-to-state migration patterns in 2018. New Jersey captured the №1 spot with 66.8 of the company’s moves taking people to other states. New Jersey has been in the top 10 in this ranking for the past 10 years.

Conversely, Vermont must be just awesome, because 72.6 percent of the moves there were inbound last year.

The company not only kept track of the numbers, it also surveyed people about their reasons for moving in or out of a state. While things like weather and cost of living can play a part, the report indicates there are other reasons, too.

In New Jersey, the numbers said:

Some 4.61 percent of inbound residents thought New Jersey would be a great place to retire, while 34.51 percent were seeking somewhere else to spend their Golden Years.

Jobs, however, were important in bringing people in. Some 61.84 percent of inbound folks said they are here now because of their job. About 34.73 percent listed employment as their reason for leaving.

Lifestyle was another category, although we’re not sure exactly what that entails. But, 7.24 percent moved here for “lifestyle,” while 17.36 percent left for the same reason.

Also, we’re getting younger. Of those moving in, 18.44 percent were 18–34 years of age, and 10.47 percent were outbound. Of those 65 years old and older, 24.82 percent were headed this way, while 34.28 percent were headed out.

Since there are way more than just one moving company in the nation, these numbers aren’t exact. But, given the state has consistently ranked near the top of the annual study for outbound residents, it’s pretty safe to assume people are looking for someplace better, or warmer, or less expensive or with a better “lifestyle” to live. Unless, of course, they have a job here.