Forgotten Angels Remembers Equine in Need

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Forgotten Angels Equine Rescue has been rescuing New Jersey’s state animal, the horse, from slaughter for four years but became an official 501 3c non-profit organization in 2014. Ensuring quality care and treatment, the service provides intervention, education and outreach to the community to promote public awareness for the cause.

So far, Forgotten Angels Equine Rescue, which is made up of all volunteers and is based in Medford, has saved 109 horses and remains the only horse rescue in Burlington County. In educating the community, the organizations hosts events and activities in addition to fostering an environment that teaches patience, kindness and creates a sense of moral and social well-being. Its most recent event was held on Tuesday, Oct. 18 and was created to raise funds for a crippled 2-year-old mare thoroughbred racehorse who was ready to ship to slaughter and to purchase a new fence which would expand the land for the horses.

“We teach kindness and patience through gentle horsemanship. We don’t yell or use disciplines with our horses, and they only get trained with praise,” Darlene Supnick, president of the organization and owner of the farm it operates on, said. “Also, most of the time if we ride, we use bit-less riding so no horses will have bits in theirs mouths”

Many people are unaware of the dramatic prevalence of horse slaughter, animal abuse and neglect throughout the nation. According to The Horse Fund, United State Department of Agriculture statistics show that more than 92 percent of horses slaughtered are in good condition and able to live productive lives. For this reason, the organization is always trying to raise funds to rescue horses that are standing in kill pens.

“Normally, we have a big Facebook network of the rescues, and watch for people posting about horses ready to be shipped to a kill shelter,” Supnick said. “We also check out the Cranbury Sale Stable and Horse and Tack Auction in Cranbury, and every one once in awhile someone who has a horse dies or someone just can’t afford to keep their horse and we intercept them.”

For the organization, the easiest part of rescuing these horses is initially paying their slaughter price to the kill broker, a person who buys horses either with the intent to sell them to a slaughterhouse or who acts as a middleman for slaughterhouses. Then, once the horses are pulled off the kill pens, it costs the organization on average about $700 in the first 30 days.

Despite costs and in an attempt to provide comprehensive rescue services after a rescue, Forgotten Angels Equine Rescue also aids the equine by providing transportation, holding facilities and humane and quality care for the abused, abandoned and neglected horses as well as other animals including a blind rooster, crippled goat and an old donkey.

“We give them good food, the best grain, the best hay, veterinarians for shots, we have their feet and teeth done and more,” Supnick said. “We’ve saved over 100 horses and follow up with each contract. If someone can’t keep up with their horse, the contract says that they have to give them back to us. We also visit all the farms before we send the horses out.”

To help its lifesaving endeavors, the organization constantly needs funds for quarantine, medical funds, vaccines, farrier and dentistry. To assist Forgotten Angels Equine Rescue in helping equines everywhere, the community is encouraged to make a tax-deductible donation through PayPal.

To send a contribution via PayPal, select “pay or send money” and enter the organization’s email, forgottenangelsequinerescue@gmail.com. Check donations can also be mailed to Forgotten Angels Equine Rescue, 288 Hartford Road, Medford, 08055.

If residents are unable to make a financial donation, they should also consider instead volunteering either by helping with the chores or grooming at the rescue or by hosting a fundraising event. Experienced grant writers are also desperately needed. For more information, contact call (609) 820–6377 or email forgottenangelsequinerescue@gmail.com.