Artist’s paintings brighten up Pinelands Branch Library

The many signs of spring aren’t only found outside in Medford. They have taken bloom in the form of artwork inside the Pinelands Branch Library.

Medford artist Diane Wallace is displaying nine paintings at the library during the entire season of spring. The nine paintings are available for sale.

Wallace, 62, took up art as a profession 10 years ago. Since then, she has done works for different businesses and organizations in town. Being out in the community was one of her goals when she took art up full-time.

“I am a prolific artist, so I always have a lot of paintings, and I’m always looking for new places to hang them,” she said.

Wallace’s art has reflected the Medford community in a positive way. She has done numerous drawings of some of the township’s most historic buildings. She said members of the community also have commissioned her to do more personal works.

“It makes me happy to paint,” she said. “I do a lot of animals, especially for Christmas time.”

Wallace was a horseback rider and has a love for animals. When she first took up art, her first works were of horses.

“I started art with very detailed horse drawings,” she said. “I would spend hours working on those drawings.”

Like her personality, Wallace describes her art as outgoing and spontaneous. She said she likes her personality to come out in her artwork.

Many of these aspects of happiness and joy are present in Wallace’s display of paintings at the library. The pictures use bright, pastel-like colors. They depict symbols of spring such as birds, rabbits and flowers.

Wallace uses a limited color palette to make her paintings more vibrant. The limited palette is something she picked up on from a fellow artist years ago. Through the colors and brushwork, Wallace’s spring portraits seem to really pop.

“They’re all spring-like,” Wallace said. “They’re all considered spring medium.”

Wallace said her works have added a splash of color to the library. As she was hanging the paintings two weeks ago, she received a lot of positive feedback.

“When I was hanging the paintings on both Friday and Monday, they started looking,” she said. “The director said the paintings added a lot of color and light to the inside.”

Adding a bit of life to the community is something Wallace wants to convey. She said some of the youth are missing out on art since many schools have been cutting it.

“Schools are starting to cut art programs,” she said. “I feel like people don’t realize that it’s not just art. It keeps your brain alive and it’s a good way to add problem solving.”

Through her lively paintings, Wallace hopes other people will become enlightened and inspired to find their creative side and take up art on their own.

All nine of Wallace’s works can be viewed during regular library hours and are for sale. Thirty percent of the proceeds from any painting sold will be donated to the Medford Library Association. Wallace’s spring exhibition runs through June 16.